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Fuck Yeah The Boss

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Sarfraz Manzoor - My favourite album: Tunnel of Love by Bruce Springsteen | Music | guardian.co.uk
Listening to Tunnel of Love reminds me of what Bob Dylan said about his 1975 record Blood on the Tracks. “A lot of people tell me they enjoy that album,” Dylan said. “It’s hard for me to relate to that. You know, people enjoying that type of pain.” There is a fair amount of pain in Tunnel of Love – the dull gnawing pain of seeing life stray from the hoped for script. I love how Springsteen’s song-writing refuses to trade in certainties; in Cautious Man he sings about a man who “on his right hand (had) tattooed the word love and on his left hand was the word fear/and in which hand he held his fate was never clear”. When I first heard the album I was a chronically inexperienced teenager who knew of love only what I gleaned from the songs of Lionel Richie and Foreigner; it was through listening to Tunnel of Love that I first learned that boy meets girl was the beginning and not the end of the story.
Rock music can sound hopelessly naïve as one enters adulthood; songs become vehicles for nostalgic time travel. The genius of Tunnel of Love is that its themes have become more pertinent with time; adulthood is after all a process of accepting the absence of absolute certainty and Tunnel of Love is a record riddled with doubt and the impossibility of truly knowing oneself or those to whom we entrust our love: in the words of Brilliant Disguise: “God have mercy on the man who doubts what he’s sure of.” I know of no other album that has better captured the messy three dimensional reality of relationships.

Sarfraz Manzoor - My favourite album: Tunnel of Love by Bruce Springsteen | Music | guardian.co.uk

Listening to Tunnel of Love reminds me of what Bob Dylan said about his 1975 record Blood on the Tracks. “A lot of people tell me they enjoy that album,” Dylan said. “It’s hard for me to relate to that. You know, people enjoying that type of pain.” There is a fair amount of pain in Tunnel of Love – the dull gnawing pain of seeing life stray from the hoped for script. I love how Springsteen’s song-writing refuses to trade in certainties; in Cautious Man he sings about a man who “on his right hand (had) tattooed the word love and on his left hand was the word fear/and in which hand he held his fate was never clear”. When I first heard the album I was a chronically inexperienced teenager who knew of love only what I gleaned from the songs of Lionel Richie and Foreigner; it was through listening to Tunnel of Love that I first learned that boy meets girl was the beginning and not the end of the story.

Rock music can sound hopelessly naïve as one enters adulthood; songs become vehicles for nostalgic time travel. The genius of Tunnel of Love is that its themes have become more pertinent with time; adulthood is after all a process of accepting the absence of absolute certainty and Tunnel of Love is a record riddled with doubt and the impossibility of truly knowing oneself or those to whom we entrust our love: in the words of Brilliant Disguise: “God have mercy on the man who doubts what he’s sure of.” I know of no other album that has better captured the messy three dimensional reality of relationships.

— 3 years ago with 40 notes
#Bruce Springsteen  #Sarfraz Manzoor  #Tunnel of Love  #albums  #love  #my favourite album  #The Guardian 
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN AND THE E STREET BAND TO PERFORM FULL ALBUM SEQUENCES AT MADISON SQUARE GARDEN IN NEW YORK CITY →

Special programs announced for this weekend’s Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band shows at Madison Square Garden

On Saturday, November 7, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band will perform The Wild, the Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle in its entirety for the first time.

On Sunday, November 8, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band will perform The River in its entirety for the first time.

The Wild, the Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle was originally released in 1973 and The River was originally released in 1980. They now join Born to Run, Darkness on the Edge of Town, and Born in the USA as albums that Bruce and the Band have performed in their entirety during their Fall tour.

Bruce Springsteen News: brucespringsteen.net

— 4 years ago with 7 notes
#Bruce Springsteen  #news  #The River  #The Wild the Innocent and the E-street Shuffle  #live  #albums